Ignoring Some

Sometimes, you’ll ask someone multiple questions, but they decide to answer just a few. You understand that asking someone numerous questions may leave a few overlooked, so you simply repeat the questions they hadn’t answered; you deliver these questions along with your next response. But, again, the other party ignores your questions. In your third response you only ask the previously unanswered questions, and nothing else – and they don’t respond, at all.

This is especially amusing when done through email, or some form of written communication, because it just makes the other person look like an ass. I mean, it’s right there. All the questions are in front of them, written down.

When they fail to respond, I'll think the other person is intentionally avoiding the question(s) because they don’t know the answer, and don’t want to admit their ignorance. Or, perhaps they think you’re baiting them and therefore they’ve grown needlessly defensive.

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Or, for example, the person with whom you’re corresponding had given you a long list of their credentials, listing a ‘production company’ as one of them. When you ask what they’ve created with this company and ‘where can I find more information?’ they realize you’re actually going to look into their long list of “credentials” (i.e. falsifications). They grow nervous, withdrawn, and do not respond. Or maybe they'll even say, “I’d rather tell you in person” – because that’s always what you want to read when you’re vetting a potential production member.


The person who doesn't respond to your repeated questions can easily fall into one of these three categories:


  1. Too careless to read your words and respond.
  2. Too insecure to admit they don't know something and so ignore your words.
  3. Have poor communication skills and grow defensive and therefore cause unnecessary tension and potential drama.

This person isn’t terribly communicative or forthcoming, and therefore not one you’d want on your team. If they’re ignoring your questions, it’s probably okay to ignore them.

People are often concerned about how they will be perceived, rather than concern themselves of their own safety - be is physical, or mental. It's time to start thinking about yourself, in a sense; there's no reason to tangle with the mental stress of an uncommunicative person when you could find someone more suitable - and eager - to work with you!

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