Credibility Through Experienced Team Members


When you start a new brand or organization, you advertise it to gain interest. But why would anyone listen to you, anyway?


In order to attract attention, you have to have something to offer. Even a basic Tumblr blog can gain 15,000 followers simply by posting photos, because that’s what they offer – visual art. It’s a bit harder to attract attention right off the bat when you generally write articles and have few visual elements to share. Or, maybe you’re an organization with a message, and you want participation. In order to gain that attention and participation, gaining credibility will help provide authority to your words. And you can gain credibility based on your – and your team’s – expertise.

In the film industry, I’ve seen many people give themselves extra credits when, often, that person can’t really do the job they so claim they can. Behind the ‘visual storytelling’ of the movies, there’s a lot of producing and networking to get the job done. People who want to go out there and establish a name for themselves often learn how to make themselves look good without offering a real product behind their words.

With your business, you want to make sure that the stories you’re telling are accurate, and are relevant to what your brand has to offer – without going overboard. There’s a point where the ‘who we are’ ends and the bragging begins.

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Ultimately, you want to present yourself in a way that doesn’t seem disingenuous, because what you say about yourself isn’t what makes your reputation – it’s what people say about you.

For instance, my online personal bio. is brief but telling. I state who I am and what I do in the first sentence of my bio. I then use my website ‘about‘ page for an extended bio, while using a shortened version of this bio across my social media sites. My resume and artist CV are limited to 1-2.5 pages, listing only a selection of my best achievements. Though I have additional skills beyond those listed on my resume, I removed those skills that aren’t relevant to my current work and interests. I also have a blog with periodic updates about my artistic and professional endeavors, giving authority to the skills I’ve claimed.

It took me about two years to properly express who I am and what I do in a brief and concise way; finding the balance between ‘truth’ and ‘overdoing it’ can seem like a fine line. In fact, I didn’t present enough information when I first began, overlooking skills I took for granted, oblivious to the fact that these skills are used in my professional work every day.

I didn’t use my social media sites properly, with no ‘bio’ information on any site except my main website, assuming that the viewer would click on my website to learn more. I would skimp on credits when I posted a new video to my YouTube or Vimeo accounts because I thought it was implied ‘I made it,’ and the credits were in the end of the videos, which I thought people watched all the way through.


And that’s what you want to avoid – giving too little information.


When you don’t attest to the skills you have and the jobs you’ve done, you’re limiting the public scope of your skills and the breadth of your work. Therefore, you’re limiting your credibility, and the authority behind your work will be low because you don’t have ‘enough to show.’ And, sadly, someone else could even claim they did your job, because you weren’t proactive in noting your work.

When you don’t attest to the skills you have and the jobs you’ve done, you’re limiting the public scope of your skills and the breadth of your work. Therefore, you’re limiting your credibility, and the authority behind your work will be low because you don’t have ‘enough to show.’ And, sadly, someone else could even claim they did your job, because you weren’t proactive in noting your work.

When your business and individual team members present themselves in a limiting way, it makes people take a step back and wonder:

1. Where can I find more information?

2. What other work have they done to prove they're an authority on this subject?

3. Is this a real business?


Well, if your members or contributors don’t have their own work online, or a separate online presence, this is where ‘author’ pages come into play on most larger websites, such as those used on NPR.org.

On a single post, an author can be represented in multiple ways: with a little photo of the member’s face, along with their name and job title beside it at the top of a post (e.g.), at the bottom of the post with a photo and brief description and social media links (e.g.), and in numerous other ways.

Often, the name of the member and the member’s photo will lead to an ‘author page’ with additional information about that author and additional posts they’ve written. The organization has control over these pages so they can have the same look and feel, adding to the professionalism of the person – and the website – through design.

You can also learn more about adding author boxes to individual posts, and how to add author pages to your website.

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